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Ask questions first, knit later!

Don’t make the mistake of making something you love that the recipient might not care for. Give them ownership well in advance. Show what you are planning, work with their preferences, and even let them choose. Build enthusiasm and a bridge to success well before you pick up needles and yarn.

Sweet and sassy
Our kid’s knits are downsized versions of grown-up knits that have appeared before in the magazine. We recolored them, and you may as well. Your goal is to make that little princess or cowboy happy with one of your knit gifts. 

Imagine the pleasure of a little one knowing that this special skirt was made especially for her, and in colors that she loves. Or that his sweater is just like Mommy’s or Daddy’s. Do remember that personal tastes develop early and refine themselves as we grow. Making a bright orange sweater may not rock the fashion world, but if it gets worn, you have accomplished your goal. Everyone is happy!

Guys will be guys
As we approach the guys in our lives, there are certainly boundaries to consider when adding a hand-knit to their wardrobes. Our two cardigans cover both sides of the spectrum, a classic in ivory and a bold patchwork in masculine colors. Either can be personalized to his wishes?—?let him decide! A cool reception may call for a little more research or even abandoning the project altogether. But if you create a sweater he wants, who cares about it being a surprise? 

You’ve heard of the “The Boyfriend Curse” where the knitter made a sweater for a boyfriend, and after presenting the sweater, the relationship was history. You have to laugh?—?if a relationship ends over a sweater, thank your lucky stars that you are only out the sweater!

1 in TEN
As you make sweaters for yourselves, your friends, or your grown daughters, you come across issues of fit. Not everyone is a perfect small, medium, or large, so we offer you a series of sweaters sized in increments of 2 inches. The simple silhouettes are worked in interesting yarns. These are meant to be wardrobe staples, so you can throw one on and face the day attractively. The sizing is marked in finished sizes of the garment, so you decide what amount of ease you like and add it to your bust measurement. Take out a couple of existing sweaters or T-shirts that fit as you like, and use them for finished measurements. 

While you look at those patterns, take half an hour and study the difference between the sizes to get a feel for how easily you can refine other patterns to work for you. 

Swingtime!
Our skirt issue (K109) featured the Ruffles make the grade skirt that we now have kid-sized as First-grade ruffles, The Wheat skirt, full of short rows in contrasting colors, is now followed by Lavender fields, presented in 10 sizes. The swing-knitting process is a study in following charts and working color fields into organic shapes within the garment. Approach the collar in steps: knock out a chart in just a few minutes or a single sitting, then move on. You’ll be amazed at how fun and rewarding it will be!

Speaking of collars and color!
How many scarves have you knit? Laura Bryant creates a ribbed scarf using a stacking technique. The argyle appears as you knit the hand-dyed yarn while paying attention to the color movement. Make it just long enough, then attach it to a boucle jacket for a kimono-style collar.

The warmer weather might allow baring a little skin. Summer strings offers a textured halter with a clever multi-strand neck finish. Flirting with fire offers an off-the-shoulder feel with duplicate stitch and figure-flattering curves. 

Knit knack!
Needle play can make the most of your skills and yarns. Take on entrelac in Summer shades, full of flowing color where alternate tiers of blocks feature eyelets. Or play gray and white off one another in Summer diamonds, where mosaic joins two differently scaled diamond lace patterns for a crisp yet feminine knit. Maybe you are more comfortable placing a feather-and-fan lace as a border in Spring roll. No matter the choice, each is a true testament of your skills. 

The goal of most knitters is to enjoy the process?—?and get a finished product that is used and loved.

Remember—when a knit brings warmth, joy, and pleasure, it is used. A garment that is loved will be worn; don’t dread if one day it looks worn. Imagine each wearing includes the love you have transferred into the yarn whether you are nearby or not. Knits are family friendly, and that is forever. 






Rick Mondragon,
Editor


Ask questions first, knit later!

Don’t make the mistake of making something you love that the recipient might not care for. Give them ownership well in advance. Show what you are planning, work with their preferences, and even let them choose. Build enthusiasm and a bridge to success well before you pick up needles and yarn.

Sweet and sassy
Our kid’s knits are downsized versions of grown-up knits that have appeared before in the magazine. We recolored them, and you may as well. Your goal is to make that little princess or cowboy happy with one of your knit gifts. 

Imagine the pleasure of a little one knowing that this special skirt was made especially for her, and in colors that she loves. Or that his sweater is just like Mommy’s or Daddy’s. Do remember that personal tastes develop early and refine themselves as we grow. Making a bright orange sweater may not rock the fashion world, but if it gets worn, you have accomplished your goal. Everyone is happy!

Guys will be guys
As we approach the guys in our lives, there are certainly boundaries to consider when adding a hand-knit to their wardrobes. Our two cardigans cover both sides of the spectrum, a classic in ivory and a bold patchwork in masculine colors. Either can be personalized to his wishes?—?let him decide! A cool reception may call for a little more research or even abandoning the project altogether. But if you create a sweater he wants, who cares about it being a surprise? 

You’ve heard of the “The Boyfriend Curse” where the knitter made a sweater for a boyfriend, and after presenting the sweater, the relationship was history. You have to laugh?—?if a relationship ends over a sweater, thank your lucky stars that you are only out the sweater!

1 in TEN
As you make sweaters for yourselves, your friends, or your grown daughters, you come across issues of fit. Not everyone is a perfect small, medium, or large, so we offer you a series of sweaters sized in increments of 2 inches. The simple silhouettes are worked in interesting yarns. These are meant to be wardrobe staples, so you can throw one on and face the day attractively. The sizing is marked in finished sizes of the garment, so you decide what amount of ease you like and add it to your bust measurement. Take out a couple of existing sweaters or T-shirts that fit as you like, and use them for finished measurements. 

While you look at those patterns, take half an hour and study the difference between the sizes to get a feel for how easily you can refine other patterns to work for you. 

Swingtime!
Our skirt issue (K109) featured the Ruffles make the grade skirt that we now have kid-sized as First-grade ruffles, The Wheat skirt, full of short rows in contrasting colors, is now followed by Lavender fields, presented in 10 sizes. The swing-knitting process is a study in following charts and working color fields into organic shapes within the garment. Approach the collar in steps: knock out a chart in just a few minutes or a single sitting, then move on. You’ll be amazed at how fun and rewarding it will be!

Speaking of collars and color!
How many scarves have you knit? Laura Bryant creates a ribbed scarf using a stacking technique. The argyle appears as you knit the hand-dyed yarn while paying attention to the color movement. Make it just long enough, then attach it to a boucle jacket for a kimono-style collar.

The warmer weather might allow baring a little skin. Summer strings offers a textured halter with a clever multi-strand neck finish. Flirting with fire offers an off-the-shoulder feel with duplicate stitch and figure-flattering curves. 

Knit knack!
Needle play can make the most of your skills and yarns. Take on entrelac in Summer shades, full of flowing color where alternate tiers of blocks feature eyelets. Or play gray and white off one another in Summer diamonds, where mosaic joins two differently scaled diamond lace patterns for a crisp yet feminine knit. Maybe you are more comfortable placing a feather-and-fan lace as a border in Spring roll. No matter the choice, each is a true testament of your skills. 

The goal of most knitters is to enjoy the process?—?and get a finished product that is used and loved.

Remember—when a knit brings warmth, joy, and pleasure, it is used. A garment that is loved will be worn; don’t dread if one day it looks worn. Imagine each wearing includes the love you have transferred into the yarn whether you are nearby or not. Knits are family friendly, and that is forever. 






Rick Mondragon,
Editor


Knitting for family can be rewarding or frustrating, depending on how you approach the task.

By now you probably know who would and who wouldn’t appreciate a hand knit. Perhaps a scarf, hat, or pair of socks has been well received. There are also those who have shown a great interest in your knitting and the results. These admirers are perfect candidates for something more ambitious—a hand-knit garment. 

Knitting for family can be rewarding or frustrating, depending on how you approach the task.

By now you probably know who would and who wouldn’t appreciate a hand knit. Perhaps a scarf, hat, or pair of socks has been well received. There are also those who have shown a great interest in your knitting and the results. These admirers are perfect candidates for something more ambitious—a hand-knit garment.